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Posts Tagged ‘Lent’

Last year for Lent I participated in an online book club via WINE (Women in the New Evangelization) in which we read and discussed Walk in Her Sandals.  Our facilitator (Allison Gingras of Reconciled to You) came up with the fun Instagram challenge below.

lenten walk.png

At first I was content to share a picture but as is my way I quickly had to make it harder for myself by coming up with a quotation for each day as well.  Having done all that work, I thought I would at least share the fruits of my labors in case anyone might find them helpful or enjoyable!

The quotations are attributed, and the pictures are all mine.  🙂

DAY 1         

Word:  Walk     Picture:  Conservatory in Como Park, St. Paul, MinnesotaLent pic 1Excited to start the Lenten journey!

DAY 2     

Word:  Disciple     Picture:  Roof of parking garage in downtown Knoxvillerefugee-march-14Love this picture of Lorelei with the sign she carried when we marched in solidarity with immigrants and refugees. With our parish church in the background and the sign she is holding, I think this picture says a lot about the demands of discipleship.

DAY 3     

Word:  Grace     Picture:  Cathedral of the Assumption, Louisville, KentuckyLent pic 2“Do you want the Lord to give you many graces? Visit Him often.” ~ Saint John Bosco  

DAY 4     

Word:  Season     Picture:  Forks of the River Trails in Knoxville, TennesseeLent pic 3“Love is a fruit in season at all times and within reach of every hand.” ~ Mother Teresa 

DAY 5     

Word:  Open     Picture:  Statue of Mary in my gardenLent pic 4“Let’s not be afraid to receive each day’s surprise. Whether it comes to us as sorrow or as joy. It will open a new place in our hearts . . .” ~ Henri Nouwen

DAY 6     

Word:  King     Picture:  Main Altar, Cathedral of Saint Paul in MinnesotaLent pic 5“This is the calling of Christians: . . . To make this kingdom of Christ a reality, to eliminate hatred and cruelty, to spread throughout the earth the strong and soothing balm of love.” ~ Saint Josemaria.

DAY 7     

Word:  Gift     Picture:  William on his 16th birthdayBest of 2017 - Willima's birthday“If you . . . know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will your Father who is in heaven give good things to those who ask him?” ~ Matthew 7:11. May we all greet God’s gifts with the same delight William showed upon opening this one!  

DAY 8     

Word:  Wait     Picture:  side altar, Cathedral of Saint PaulLent pic 6Psalm 130:5-6: “I wait for the LORD, my soul waits, and in his word I hope; my soul waits for the Lord more than watchmen for the morning, more than watchmen for the morning.”

DAY 9     

Word:  Hosanna     Picture:  Sky in front of my houseLent pic 7Isaiah 6:3: “Holy holy holy, Lord God of hosts, Heaven and Earth are full of Your glory!” 

DAY 10     

Word:  Empty     Picture:  Ancient bowl at the Minneapolis Institute of ArtLent pic 8Empty me, Lord, that I may be filled with You. 

DAY  11     

Word:  Abandon     Picture:  Carl Cowan Park in Knoxville, TennesseeLent pic 10Saint Ignatius Loyola: “Few souls understand what God would accomplish in them if they were to abandon themselves unreservedly to Him and if they would allow His grace to mold them accordingly.” 

DAY 12     

Word:  Heart     Picture:  University of Tennessee Trial Gardens, KnoxvilleLent pic 11Psalm 51:10: “Create in me a pure heart, O God, and renew a steadfast spirit within me.”

DAY 13     

Word:  Cleanse     Picture:  Front porch of our former homeLent pic 12      Psalm 51:2: “Wash me thoroughly from my iniquity and cleanse me from my sin.”

DAY 14     

Word:  Love     Picture:  Our mantel at ChristmasLent pic 131 Corinthians 13:13:  “There are three things that last . . . The greatest of these is love.”

DAY 15     

Word:  Sacrifice     Picture:  Pieta at Cathedral of Saint Paul in MinnesotaLent pic 14Mother Teresa: “A sacrifice to be real must cost, must hurt and must empty ourselves. Give yourself fully to God. He will use you to accomplish great things on the condition that you believe much more in His LOVE than in your weakness.”

DAY 16     

Word:  Saint     Picture:  Chapel of Saint Patrick at Cathedral of Saint PaulLent pic 15“All hail to Saint Patrick!” ~ Father Frederick Faber

DAY 17     

Word:  Generous     Picture:  Forks of the River Trails in KnoxvilleLent pic 16St. Louis de Montfort: “Pray with great confidence, with confidence based upon the goodness and infinite generosity of God and upon the promises of Jesus Christ. God is a spring of living water which flows unceasingly into the hearts of those who pray.” 

DAY 18     

Word:  Trust     Picture:  Lighthouse in Duluth, MinnesotaLent pic 17“I will trust the promise. You will carry me straight to shore.” ~ Rend Collective

DAY 19     

Word:  Good     Picture:  Detail of one of my Christmas decorationsLent pic 18Good Saint Joseph, pray for us! 

DAY 20     

Word:  Victory     Picture:  Bookwalter Cemetery in Knoxville, TennesseeLent pic 191 Corinthians 15:55: “Where, O death, is your victory?”

DAY 21     

Word:  Sight     Picture:  Cathedral of the Assumption in LouisvilleLent pic 202 Corinthians 5:7: “We walk by faith and not by sight.”

DAY 22     

Word:  Strength     Picture:  My son Teddy after sweeping the LiftathonLent pic 21Philippians 4:13: “I can do all things through Him that gives me strength.”

DAY 23     

Word:  Cross     Picture:  Freedom Baptist Church in Rosedale, MarylandLent pic 22We adore You, O Christ, and we praise You, because by Your Holy Cross you have redeemed the world.

DAY 24     

Word:  Mary     Picture:  Boticelli painting at the Baltimore Museum of ArtLent 23“Never be afraid of loving the Blessed Virgin too much. You can never love her more than Jesus did.”  ~ Saint Maximilian Kolbe

DAY 25     

Word:  Suffering     Picture:  Bookwalter Methodist Cemetery, KnoxvilleLent 24Lamentations 1:12: “Is it nothing to you, all who pass by? Look around and see. Is any suffering like my suffering?” 

DAY 26     

Word:  Prayer     Picture:  St. Peter’s Catholic Church, Harpers FerryLent 25“Prayer draws into the soul the Holy Spirit, and raises man to Heaven.” ~ St. Ephraim of Syria 

DAY 27     

Word:  Silence     Picture:  Jefferson Rock in Harpers Ferry, West VirginiaLent 26“We need to find God, and he cannot be found in noise and restlessness. God is the friend of silence. See how nature – trees, flowers, grass- grows in silence; see the stars, the moon and the sun, how they move in silence… We need silence to be able to touch souls.” ~ Mother Teresa 

DAY 28     

Word:  Faithful     Picture:  E. Vedder Painting, Baltimore Museum of ArtLent 27“The Sorrowing Soul between Doubt and Faith”   Mother Teresa: “Be faithful in small things because it is in them that your strength lies.”

DAY 29     

Word:  Petitions     Picture:  Statue at the Baltimore Museum of ArtLent 28Saint Thomas Aquinas: “. . . Since she is the Queen of Mercy . . . She cannot refuse your petition.”

DAY 30     

Word:  Watch     Picture:  My son’s kitten, SawyerLent 29Luke 21:36: “Be always on the watch . . . that you may be able to stand before the Son of Man.”

DAY 31     

Word:  Frozen     Picture:  Saint Francis in my gardenLent 30“The sky can never be frozen/because its vastness has chosen/all warmth of our lives as we look above/with unbreakable hearts armoured in love.” ~ Munia Khan 

DAY 32     

Word:  Peace     Picture:  Festival of Nations at DollywoodLent 31“Let there be peace on earth . . .” ~ Sy Miller and Jill Jackson

DAY 33     

Word:  Darkness     Picture:  Jack O’Lantern Spectacular in LouisvilleLent 32“Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that.” ~ Martin Luther King, Jr.

DAY 34     

Word:  Sunrise     Picture:  Morning in my front yardLent 33Psalm 65:8: “The whole earth is filled with awe at your wonders; where morning dawns, where evening fades, you call forth songs of joy.”

DAY 35     

Word:  Maternity     Picture:  Cathedral of the Assumption, LouisvilleLent 34G.K. Chesterton: “Mary leads us to Christ, but Christ leads us back to His Mother, for without Mary’s maternity, Jesus would become a mere abstraction to us.”

DAY 36     

Word:  Beginning     Picture:  Pellissippi Greenway,  KnoxvilleLent 37“Forget the former things; do not dwell on the past. See, I am doing a new thing! Now it springs up; do you not perceive it?” Isaiah 43:16.17.

DAY 37     

Word:  Freedom     Picture:  Cades Cove, Smoky Mountainsfall 2016 2“Freedom consists not in doing what we like, but in having the right to do what we ought.” ~ John Paul the Great

DAY 38     

Word:  Spring     Picture:  My summer gardenLent 38Saint Therese of Lisieux: “If every tiny flower wanted to be a rose, spring would lose its loveliness.” 

DAY 39     

Word:  Joy     Picture:  Painting by Emily for my father’s birthdayLent 35“All the trees in the forest sing for joy.”  Psalm 96:12

Picture 2:  John and I, Christmas Eve 2016

Lent 36“Joy is prayer; joy is strength: joy is love.” ~ Mother Teresa

 

DAY 40     

Word:  Flower     Picture:  Late Summer gardenLent 39Saint Jean Vianney: “As a vigilant gardener labors from morning till night to destroy the weeds in his garden, and to ornament it with flowers, so let us labor every day to uproot the vices of our soul and to adorn it with virtues.”

DAY 41     

Word:  Light     Picture:  Cades Cove, Smoky MountainsLent 40“God is light, and in Him there is no darkness.” 1 John 1:5

DAY 42     

Word:  Fire     Picture:  Backyard Christmas tree bonfireLent 41“Go forth and set the world on fire.” ~ Saint Ignatius Loyola

DAY 43     

Word:  Sisters  Picture:  Emily and Lorelei on Election Day 2016Lent 42       “Sisters are different flowers from the same garden.” ~ Unknown

DAY 44     

Word:  Room     Picture:  Inn at Woodhaven, LouisvilleLent 43“When you pray, go into your room, close the door, and pray to your Father.” Matthew 6:6 

DAY 45     

Word:  Happiness     Picture:  Lorelei with a longed-for Christmas giftLent 44“You pray, you love–that is the happiness of man upon the earth.” ~ Saint Jean Marie Baptist Vianney

DAY 46     

Word:  Drink     Picture:  Teddy during Junior Parents’ WeekendLent 45Ecclesiastes 9:7: “Eat thy bread with joy, and drink thy wine with a merry heart.”

DAY 47     

Word:  Easter     Picture:  Immaculate Conception Church, KnoxvilleIMG_5380John Paul II: “We are the Easter people, and Alleluia is our song.”

Have a blessed Lent!

 

 

 

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So today’s post is brought to you courtesy of the Catholic Women’s Blogger Network.  It’s part of our monthly blog hop and I totally would not be writing it if it weren’t.

Because here’s where I peek out from under my somewhat ill-fitting Catholic blogger hat and admit that my true feelings about Confession are a mixture of guilt and discomfort.  I hate that but it’s the truth.

I wrote the whole story here if you want to read it.  When did I write it?  A little over four years ago, which is the last time I went to Confession.

I can’t tell you how I long for the days when we were marched regularly into the cafeteria of St. Joseph School, with no advance warning or choice in the matter, and told that we were going to confession in the dark little closet where Father Henkel waited.  I’d stand in a red plaid line, leaning against the radiator for warmth and secretly wondering about how long certain people were taking.  Before I knew it I was all finished, back on the hard wooden kneeler saying two Our Fathers and one Hail Mary, and my soul was white as snow.

Clearly this is the Lent of hard things for me with lessons to be learned, and if I am really paying attention it would seem that this is one of them.  Will I go to our parish’s upcoming Lenten penance service and find a friendly priest in the basement to hear my uncomfortable and unprofessional recitation of sins? Only time will tell.

To read more reflections on the Sacrament of Confession, click the image below.

march blog hop

 

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lent-1

I’m grateful that I’m committed to contributing a post to the Catholic Women Bloggers Network bloghop today, because the truth is  our family has been needing to reevaluate “how we Lent.”  What was once a pretty intense observance has in recent years become fairly cursory and my husband and I are not happy about that.

Why did this happen?  I’m going to blame a combination of factors–our move five years ago to a house half an hour away from our parish church,  no current affiliation with a Catholic school (after 14 years), and having less and less of an inclination to leave home for church events or any other events (caused probably by burnout after years of extreme involvement).

lent-2

I often feel out of place when wearing my Catholic blogging hat because (as you will no doubt see if you–as you should!–read the rest of the posts in this hop) the majority of Catholic mom bloggers seem to be living faith-filled lives and setting great examples for their little kids and basically being all Catholic all the time better than I’ve ever been able to manage.  But maybe I am not the only one out there who feels this way and so I’m going to go public as Catholic slacker blogger to encourage all the rest of you to do better this Lent.

Now I am tempted to say, “We are so bad and sinful and we have been doing Lent all wrong! We are going to be so holy for forty days!  We will do all the Lent things there are!”  But I kind of feel like that is a recipe for disaster.  For several years I prided myself on my extremely strict Lenten fasting:  No meat at all–even fish–for forty days (except at the Friday fish fry).  No eating between meals.  No food at all on Ash Wednesday or Good Friday.  Nothing but liquids until supper on every Friday.  And no Sundays off!  I stopped doing that a few years ago and I am not going to do it again.  Honestly, I think that strictness is part of what triggered my “failure” in subsequent Lents.

so-lent

So here is what we ARE going to do (insofar as we have planned at this point).  We will all make some form of Lenten sacrifice; we will follow all rules regarding fasting and abstinence; we will go to the Stations of the Cross EVERY Friday; I am going to participate in an online book club; and at least some of us are going to take part in this Lenten meditation.  We may do more, but that will be icing on the cake (presuming no one gives up cake!).

For more ideas for Lent observances, please visit the other posts in the hop by clicking the picture below.

siena-sisters

How do you “do Lent” in your family?  If you want, you can tell me in the comments!

 

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Don’t laugh, but high up there on my list of personal goals is a desire for greater holiness.  I’ve known a few holy people in my life–have you?  They radiate peace and God’s love and you feel blessed to be in their presence.  I’d like to be one of those people, but they are rare.

I’d also like to be the kind of person with a prayer routine, or the kind who keeps a prayer journal, or attends daily Mass and/or adoration, or has a spiritual director.  While other women are envious of the well-kept houses and perfectly behaved children they see on Facebook and Pinterest, I’m jealous of the spirituality of the Catholic women I have encountered online.

Wow, how messed up does that sound?

As a someone who delights in reading and learning, you would think that at least I could manage some regular spiritual reading.  Yet the inspirational books with scriptural reflections for each day lie unopened on my nightstand, and my pile of unread religious books grows ever higher.  Whenever I manage to open one of those books, I fall asleep within minutes.

Life is busy and life is hard, and most of the time I have to content myself with at least the notion that I am living my faith through my actions instead of devoting time to prayer and spiritual reading.  I think that’s a bit of a cop out, though, and that’s one reason I was grateful for the opportunity I was given to read A Walk in Her Sandals: Experiencing Christ’s Passion through the Eyes of Women.

In exchange for my honest reflections and as part of my participation in the Siena Sisters blog hop, I received an advance copy of this creative take on the Passion of Jesus.  One thing I AM good with is deadlines so I was able to make time to read this book so I could share it with you.

Not that it was a big sacrifice.  I really enjoyed reading it, and I stayed awake too.  Written in sections by a team of ten Catholic women, this book is meant to be used as a Lenten study, either for an individual or a small group.  It is divided into six chapters, each showcasing a spiritual gift unique to women with accompanying scripture and exegesis, personal reflections, suggestions for prayer, questions for group discussion, and guidance for evangelization.

The heart of the book for me, though, were the stories that make up an imaginative thread that gives the book its title and its life.  Each chapter introduces us to some of the women who knew Jesus or his disciples, and invites us to experience the events of Holy Week through their eyes.  I’ve read things like this before, and they can easily seem a little too precious, but these stories were well done, the women carefully characterized, the narrative compelling and moving as each woman encountered Jesus and His message in her own way.  I just loved these stories.  They really brought the scripture, which  I of course have heard hundreds of times, to life in a new and exciting way for me.

I recommend you go here and order Walk in Her Sandals before Lent.  I plan to read it again myself at that time, and maybe I will be able to move a little further down that road to holiness by Easter.

This post is part of the CWBN Siena Sisters Blog Hop.  Click the picture below to see what everyone else had to say about Walk in Her Sandals.

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Lent and a Birthday

Birthday parties and Ash Wednesday don’t mix.  That’s why we celebrated William’s 13th birthday last Saturday, with a dinner party at the Lemongrass Restaurant (William loves Asian food of all types).  There were 14 of us in attendance.  We brought the cake (red velvet) and the presents (all super-cool Lord of the Rings action figures this year) with us.  I didn’t have to clean my house before, or clean up a mess afterwards!  Win-win!

william birthday cake

But today is the actual anniversary of what was one of the peak experiences of my life–giving birth to my  13 lb. 5 oz. baby boy, a VBA3C (for the uninitiated, that means Vaginal Birth after Three C-sections).  This morning I told William his birth story as we drove to school.  He especially enjoyed hearing about how he was on television all over the country.  He was born just a bit too early or I’m sure we would have been a front page AOL news story.

newborn william

Aside from being William’s birthday, it’s also the first day of Lent, a time of year of which I am inexplicably fond.  Among other things, I’m giving up Farmville this year, which will free up a LOT of time, so I am once again going to attempt to blog every day, at least briefly, for the next 40 days.

 

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Bring It On, Lent!

Am I strange because I like Lent?  I always have, even when I was a little girl.  Back then, we went to Mass every morning at school.  I loved the rhythmic way Father Henkel chanted, “Remember, man, thou are dust, to dust thou shall return” over and over and over.  I loved singing “These forty days of Lent, O Lord, to You we fast and pray, teach us to discipline our will and follow, Lord, Your way.”  I even loved the challenge of giving up something really difficult.  And I REALLY loved fried fish on Friday night–a real treat that we never had any other time of year.

As an adult, I got into some serious Lenten self-denial–going without meat all forty days, fasting strictly EVERY Friday, not eating between meals at all for the duration. We began going to the Stations of the Cross each week, something I never did as a child.

Yesterday because of an argument over the abstinence requirements that I was having with one of my teenagers, I was reading some relevant sections of Canon Law.  I was reminded that when the obligation to fast and abstain on EVERY Friday was removed, it was with the understanding that it was to be replaced with some other act of penitence.  And then a Facebook friend commented that when people shouldn’t announce their yearly Lenten disappearance from Facebook if they want it to count as a sacrifice.   This started me thinking–giving something up is great, if it’s done prayerfully.  When it starts being about endurance and pride, which I think my fasting had become, it’s time to do something new.  Staying off Facebook might be a great sacrifice, but not if all that happens is that it frees up extra time.  What if you used that freed time for prayer or good works?

I’m not going off Facebook, and not just because it would be difficult.  For one thing, it’s crucial to my blogging, which is something I want to be focusing on.  For another, I like to think that I use Facebook positively, to encourage my friends, to spread news I think is important for people to see, and to get needed social interaction.   There are some things I am going to cut back on for Lent, but I am also going to try to do some positive things. I’m announcing this one, but only because that’s the best way I know of to make sure I do it:  I am going to try to blog every day.  Posts may be very brief, but I’m going to try to put something out there EVERY DAY.  Somehow commitments I make before God seem to be easier to keep than resolutions that I make just for myself.  No, writing isn’t an act of penitence!  But it can be hard to sacrifice that time when I have other things to do.  And I will make  an effort to include more spiritual, religious, or uplifting posts for the next forty days.

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