Walking in Knoxville: A Guide for Hikers

Writing about hiking used to be a pretty big chunk of this blog.  Not so much lately, as I fell off the fitness wagon.  But fall is a great time for walking–it’s beautiful as well as cool.  So to inspire myself, and as a resource to any Knoxvillians or visitors, I’ve collected all my walking posts right here along with a brief description and picture for each.
Walking in East Knoxville: Welcoming Spring at the Knoxville Botanical Gardens and Arboretum
It’s not Spring as I am writing this but I am absolutely sure that this unsung gem will have fall foliage and flowers to delight you.  Don’t wait for Spring!
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Walking in South Knoxville
This was my introductory post of many about the 40 miles of trails in the Urban Wilderness.

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View from the Ijams River Trail

Walking in South Knoxville II: The William Hastie Natural Area
One trailhead for this section of the Urban Wilderness is in the Lake Forest neighborhood where we used to live.  We were curious and went walking back here when it wasn’t even a thing.
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Walking in South Knoxville III:  Forks of the River WMA
These are hands-down my favorite trails in the system.
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Walking in South Knoxville IV:  Anderson School Trails
These fancifully named trails that wind along an easement through private land are Emily’s favorite.
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Walking in South Knoxville V: Ross Marble Natural Area
This area features the remains of a quarrying operation, almost like exploring exotic ruins.
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Walking in South Knoxville VI:  Fort Dickerson Quarry
This place is amazing.  You will forget you are in Knoxville.
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Walking in South Knoxville VII: In the Homestretch
Fall wildflowers along the Ross Marble Quarry trails and other autumn delights.
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Walking in South Knoxville VIII: Another One Bites the Dust
It’s back to the William Hastie trails with their shady hills and wildflowers.
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Walking in South Knoxville IX:  Forks of the River
There is something for everyone in this section of trails, whether you like woods or meadows, hilly or flat, dirt or pavement.
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Walking in South Knoxville X: A Quiet Walk at the Quarry
The Mead’s Quarry trail is challenging, but it will reward you with beautiful views.
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Walking in South Knoxville XI: A Belated Fall Roundup
A collection of pictures from a variety of trails.
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Walking in South Knoxville:  Success
Another roundup of trails and pictures, including some great views.
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Walking in Knoxville:  North, South, and Further South
This one is a bit further afield with walks in Norris and the Smokies included.
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Walking in West Knoxville
This is a collection of several great places to walk in South Knoxville, suitable to all skill levels.
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A May Stroll You Must Take
If you love the smell of honeysuckle, you’ll want to do this in the Spring, but if you are an architecture fan you will enjoy it any time of year.
honeysuckle closeup
Short West Knoxville Walks
These aren’t pretty (comparatively) but they are good for exercise!
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Walking in West Knoxville:  The Jean Teague Greenway
This trail has the advantage of running right through a playground, where you can abandon your kids for awhile as you walk.
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Walking in Knoxville
This showcases the Pellissippi Greenway, which is at its best when the daffodils are in bloom.
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Two Walks
Finally, this is my very first walking post, laying out a nice hike that hits the high points of downtown Knoxville.
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I’ll continue to update this post with new hikes as I write them–I have a backlog which includes Baker Creek, House Mountain, and Haw Ridge, among others.
 
 
 

Walking in South Knoxville: Another One Bites the Dust

Y’all, I’m getting so excited!  Emily and I finished another section of Urban Wilderness Trails last weekend.  We look to be on track to get our badges before the end of the year.  And really, we will have walked way more than 40 miles, since walking all of them necessarily entails walking some of them more than once.
This time we finished up the William Hastie trails, which is actually where we began this project back in May.  Let me come right out and say that these are probably my least favorite trails.  There’s nothing wrong with them; they just aren’t as interesting to me personally as many of the others.  These pictures below show something pretty interesting and actually downright terrifying, though:
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Unfortunately the photos don’t really do it justice, but that’s a sinkhole.  A gigantic scary deep sinkhole.  The first trail off the parking lot is named Sinkhole for a reason.  As you walk you’ll see a trail off to your right that leads right up to the edge of that.  We were too scared to get close enough for a good picture, but we saw evidence that some adventurous (insane?) people had been climbing down into the thing.  To which I say, they are welcome to it.
Moving right along, we enjoyed the cool fall weather.  Walking three miles in the fall is a whole lot different than doing the same hike when it’s 90 degrees.  There are trade offs, though–no wildflowers, or at least not many.  Still, we had this instead:
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See the collapsing boards in the second picture, though?  That particular bridge (not a bridge, exactly–a raised path over an area prone to mud) was rotting right through.  No big problem when you are walking, but it could be dangerous for an inattentive mountain biker.  Looking at some of the trails they bike on intentionally, though, I imagine they’d probably just look at it as another challenge!
I always have to take a couple of path pictures when we walk:
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I’m really pleased with the way that bottom one turned out.  I wasn’t sure my iPhone would be able to pick up that tunnel effect.
Most of the Hastie trails are through the woods, but the main trail (Margaret Road) was originally a KUB access road and was kept cleared.  In fact, there’s one part that in the summer was a meadow festooned with wildflowers:
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That same part is now a somewhat chilly desert with no plant life in sight.  But the absence of trees allowed us to appreciate the blue sky.  Have you ever noticed that the sky in autumn is a deeper, more intense blue?
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Remember, if you don’t have time to get up to the mountains to enjoy the fall colors, the Urban Wilderness is much closer!
For more South Knoxville walks, see below:
Walking in South Knoxville I
Walking in South Knoxville II
Walking in South Knoxville III
Walking in South Knoxville IV
Walking in South Knoxville V
Walking in South Knoxville VI
Walking in South Knoxville VII